TITLE

The United States, appellants, v. the Libelants and Claimants of the schooner Amistad

PUB. DATE
August 2017
SOURCE
United States, Appellants, v. the Libelants & Claimants of the S;8/1/2017, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Primary Source Document
DOC. TYPE
Legal Material
ABSTRACT
Presents the US Supreme Court case regarding the schooner L'Amistad, which was the scene of a mutiny by African slaves in 1839. The case originally fron the Circuit Court of the District of Connecticut; Claim by the ship's owners, Spanish subjects, for return of the vessel, cargo, and slaves; Arguments stated in the appeal; Approval of the appeal.
ACCESSION #
21213002

 

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