TITLE

Pennsylvania resolutions on the Boston Port Act

PUB. DATE
August 2017
SOURCE
Pennsylvania Resolutions on the Boston Port Act;8/1/2017, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Primary Source Document
DOC. TYPE
Legal Material
ABSTRACT
Presents the text of resolutions made in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in June 1774 regarding the Boston Port Act, an Act of Parliament which shut up the port of Boston, Massachusetts. Resolutions by freeholders and freemen in city and county of Philadelphia; Nature of the act; Pennsylvania's condemnation of the act; Plan to organize a committee to correspond with the other colonies and other parts of Pennsylvania, to resolve the crisis.
ACCESSION #
21212854

 

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