TITLE

Temperament, character and personality disorders as predictors of response to interpersonal psychotherapy and cognitive-behavioural therapy for depression

AUTHOR(S)
Joyce, Peter R.; McKenzie, Janice M.; Carter, Janet D.; Rae, Alma M.; Luty, Suzanne E.; Frampton, Christopher M. A.; Mulder, Roger T.
PUB. DATE
June 2007
SOURCE
British Journal of Psychiatry;Jun2007, Vol. 190, p503
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
journal article
ABSTRACT
Background: Interpersonal psychotherapy and cognitive-behavioural therapy are widely accepted as effective treatments for major depression. There is little evidence on how personality disorder or personality traits affect treatment response.Aims: To determine whether personality disorder or traits have an adverse impact on treatment response to interpersonal psychotherapy or cognitive-behavioural therapy in people receiving out-patient treatment for depression.Method: The study was a randomised trial in a university-based clinical research unit for out-patients with depression.Results: Personality disorder did not adversely affect treatment response for patients with depression randomised to cognitive-behavioural therapy. Conversely, personality disorder did adversely affect treatment response for patients randomised to interpersonal psychotherapy.Conclusions: Despite the two therapies having comparable efficacy in patients with depression, response to interpersonal psychotherapy (but not cognitive-behavioural therapy) is affected by personality traits. This could suggest the two therapies are indicated for different patients or that they work by different mechanisms.
ACCESSION #
25431482

 

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