TITLE

Randomised controlled trial of interpersonal psychotherapy and cognitive-behavioural therapy for depression

AUTHOR(S)
Luty, Suzanne E.; Carter, Janet D.; Mckenzie, Janice M.; Rae, Alma M.; Frampton, Christopher M. A.; Mulder, Roger T.; Joyce, Peter R.
PUB. DATE
June 2007
SOURCE
British Journal of Psychiatry;Jun2007, Vol. 190, p496
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
journal article
ABSTRACT
Background: Interpersonal psychotherapy and cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) are established as effective treatments for major depression. Controversy remains regarding their effectiveness for severe and melancholic depression.Aims: To compare the efficacy of interpersonal psychotherapy and CBT in people receiving out-patient treatment for depression and to explore response in severe depression (Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) score above 30), and in melancholic depression.Method: Randomised clinical trial of 177 patients with a principal Axis I diagnosis of major depressive disorder receiving 16 weeks of therapy comprising 8-19 sessions. Primary outcome was improvement in MADRS score from baseline to end of treatment.Results: There was no difference between the two psychotherapies in the sample as a whole, but CBT was more effective than interpersonal psychotherapy in severe depression, and the response was comparable with that for mild and moder-ate depression. Melancholia did not predict poor response to either psychotherapy.Conclusions: Both therapies are equally effective for depression but CBT may be preferred in severe depression.
ACCESSION #
25431481

 

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