TITLE

The onset and rate of the antidepressant effect of electroconvulsive therapy. A neglected topic of research

AUTHOR(S)
Scott, Allan I.F.; Whalley, Lawrence J.; Scott, A I; Whalley, L J
PUB. DATE
June 1993
SOURCE
British Journal of Psychiatry;Jun93, Vol. 162, p725
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
journal article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the lack of research about the onset and rate of the antidepressant effect of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in Great Britain. The selection of depressed patients who will receive ECT and the recommended ECT practice have significantly changed. All depressed patients who recover with ECT require at least several treatments to have complete remission. However, this does not necessarily mean that treatments early in an ECT course are without antidepressant effect. Little research is being conducted in Great Britain. The last study of the effectiveness of ECT in the country was completed in 1983.
ACCESSION #
25022202

 

Related Articles

  • ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY AND DEPRESSION. II. SIGNIGICANCE OF ENDOGENOUS AND REACTIVE SYNDROMES. Mendels, J. // British Journal of Psychiatry;Aug65, Vol. 111 Issue 477, p682 

    The article presents a study which investigates the relationship between the response of endogenous and reactive depression to electroconvulsive therapy. The study included fifty patients with depression as the central symptom and who were referred for E.C.T. The total number of endogenous and...

  • A review of continuation and maintenance electroconvulsive therapy. Rabheru, Kiran; Persad, Emmanuel; Rabheru, K; Persad, E // Canadian Journal of Psychiatry;Jun1997, Vol. 42 Issue 5, p476 

    Background: Many patients with major psychiatric disorders who are severely ill, medication-resistant, or medication-intolerant respond more reliably and quickly to a course of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). The management of such patients after successful treatment with ECT is of...

  • Recovery from ECT in elderly patients. Fraser, R. M.; Glass, I. B. // British Journal of Psychiatry;Dec78, Vol. 133, p524 

    Nine elderly depressed patients were given ECT in courses which alternated unilateral and bilateral electrode placement; recovery times were measured. When compared with similar times for younger patients, recovery took on average five times as long from unilateral treatment and nine times as...

  • The effects of pulse ECT in neurotic and endogenous depression. Carney, M. W. P.; Sheffield, B. F.; Carney, M W // British Journal of Psychiatry;Jul74, Vol. 125, p91 

    The article presents the study that examines the response to pulse electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in the two varieties of depression. The results obtained from the pulse-treated patients was compared to 100 depressives consecutively treated with sinusoidal ECT immediately before this study. An...

  • Effect of ECT on responses to a depression questionnaire: implications for taxonomy. Pilowsky, I.; McGrath, M. D. // British Journal of Psychiatry;Dec70, Vol. 117 Issue 541, p685 

    The article describes the effect of electro-convulsive therapy (ECT) on patients' responses to individual items in a depression questionnaire, and assesses its implications for taxonomy. The depression questionnaire was administered to 45 consecutive patients with a depressive illness, and...

  • Continuation electroconvulsive therapy: preliminary guidelines and an illustrative case report. Scott, Allan I. F.; Weeks, David J.; McDonald, Claire F.; Scott, A I; Weeks, D J; McDonald, C F // British Journal of Psychiatry;Dec91, Vol. 159, p867 

    Despite renewed interest in ECT as a continuation treatment after an episode of depressive illness, few guidelines for its use are available. Meaningful research findings are few, although the potential benefits and risks of modern continuation ECT merit study. We suggest preliminary guidelines...

  • A controlled comparison of simulated and real ECT. Lambourn, J.; Gill, D. // British Journal of Psychiatry;Dec78, Vol. 133, p514 

    Two groups of 16 patients with depressive psychosis took part in a controlled evaluation of electro-convulsive therapy (ECT). One group received six brief pulse unilateral shocks under conventional anaesthesia and muscle relaxation; the second group underwent the same procedure without receiving...

  • Is old-fashioned electroconvulsive therapy more efficacious? A randomised comparative study of bilateral brief-pulse and bilateral sine-wave treatments. Scott, Allan I.F.; Rodger, Colin R.; Stocks, Ruth H.; Shering, Anne P.; Scott, A I; Rodger, C R; Stocks, R H; Shering, A P // British Journal of Psychiatry;Mar92, Vol. 160, p360 

    In-patients suffering from major depressive disorder (endogenous subtype) were randomly allocated to treatment by either traditional ECT with constant-voltage modified sine-wave stimuli (n = 17) or modern, constant-current brief-pulse ECT (n = 14). All treatments were bilateral and monitored by...

  • A CURE FOR DEPRESSION? Leason, Katie // Community Care;12/2/2004, Issue 1551, p34 

    Questions the effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) as treatment for depressed people. Overview of the ECT procedure; Other medical conditions treated by ECT; Side effects of ECT; Account of a related study published in a 2004 issue of the "British Journal of Psychiatry."

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics