TITLE

ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY AND DEPRESSION. II. SIGNIGICANCE OF ENDOGENOUS AND REACTIVE SYNDROMES

AUTHOR(S)
Mendels, J.
PUB. DATE
August 1965
SOURCE
British Journal of Psychiatry;Aug65, Vol. 111 Issue 477, p682
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
journal article
ABSTRACT
The article presents a study which investigates the relationship between the response of endogenous and reactive depression to electroconvulsive therapy. The study included fifty patients with depression as the central symptom and who were referred for E.C.T. The total number of endogenous and reactive features present in each patient were calculated and divided into five groups, including endogenous, doubtful endogenous, reactive, doubtful reactive and mixed or classical. Results indicated that there was a significantly better response in patients diagnosed as endogenous than those diagnosed as reactive or mixed. The response to treatment was significantly associated with small difference in balance between the two groups of symptoms.
ACCESSION #
24758432

 

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