TITLE

Muscle-sparing thoracotomy combined with mechanically stapled lung resection for benign lung disorders: functional results and quality of life

AUTHOR(S)
Mattioli, Girolamo; Asquasciati, Caterina; Castagnetti, Marco; Bellodi, Simona; Rossi, Giovanni; Jasonni, Vincenzo
PUB. DATE
June 2006
SOURCE
Pediatric Surgery International;Jun2006, Vol. 22 Issue 6, p491
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
journal article
ABSTRACT
We set out to review our experience with resection of benign lung lesions performed using mechanical stapling devices via a muscle-sparing thoracotomy, and provide data on long-term morbidity, functional results, and quality of life (QOL). Fifty-two patients with a benign lung disorder were included in the study. All underwent a lung resection with mechanical staplers via a muscle-sparing thoracotomy. Medical records were retrospectively searched for postoperative complications. Nineteen patients (36.5%) also underwent a final follow-up including clinical examination, radiological investigations, functional tests, and assessment of QOL by a standardized questionnaire. No intra-operative complications occurred. The resection was anatomical (lobectomy) in 28 (53%) children and wedge in 25 (47%). Five cases (9.6%) required secondary surgery. Of the 19 children undergoing long-term follow-up, 3 (16%) had musculoskeletal anomalies and 6 (31.5%) respiratory symptoms. All X-rays were normal. Spirometry was abnormal in 9 cases (47.3%). QOL was excellent/good in 17 cases (89.5%) and sufficient in 2 (10.5%). An abnormal spirometric pattern was significantly more frequent in cases with a poorer QOL. In conclusion, stapled resection via a muscle-sparing thoracotomy is a good option to perform lung resections. However, a muscle-sparing approach does not avoid entirely long-term musculoskeletal complications. QOL is good in nearly 90% of cases, but respiratory symptoms and abnormal spirometric function can be found in one third and half of the patients, respectively. An abnormal spirometry is more common in patients with a poorer QOL. Systematic radiological follow-up is unnecessary.
ACCESSION #
20988239

 

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