TITLE

Clinical experiences of using Biopatch: a chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated sponge dressing... Case study 1: renal setting

PUB. DATE
July 2014
SOURCE
British Journal of Nursing;Biopatch Supplement, Vol. 23 Issue 14, pS20
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Interview
ABSTRACT
The article presents an interview with Mark Nicholls of East Kent Hospitals University National Health Service Foundation Trust in Kent, England. When asked what made him decide to use a chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) impregnated sponge dressing in his workplace, Nicholls says that it was an audit of his facility. He comments on the role that infection prevention plays in his daily nursing activities. Nicholls believes that the use of CHG sponge dressings benefits patients.
ACCESSION #
97409214

 

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