TITLE

Can 'Religion' Enrich 'Economics'?

AUTHOR(S)
Waterman, A. M. C.
PUB. DATE
May 2014
SOURCE
Econ Journal Watch;May2014, Vol. 11 Issue 2, p233
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Interview
ABSTRACT
An interview with author A. M. C. Waterman on whether religion can enrich economics is presented. When asked on his religious background and biography and his own religious outlook, he refers to his work on the relation between theology and economic theory in Christian thinking. He says that his faith does not inform questions he choose to research. He does not think that the economic profession exhibits biases against religion or his faith in particular.
ACCESSION #
96430136

 

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