TITLE

Grist for Society

AUTHOR(S)
Lecompte, Elizabeth
PUB. DATE
September 2009
SOURCE
American Theatre;Sep2009, Vol. 26 Issue 7, p72
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Interview
ABSTRACT
An interview with playwright Richard Maxwell is presented. He explained his reason for writing the play "People without History" after directing William Shakespeare's play "Henry IV Part 1." He described how Shakespeare influences his writing style and language choices. He also described his style in attaching words to a character.
ACCESSION #
44169115

 

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