TITLE

5:4

AUTHOR(S)
WIlson, Deborah J.
PUB. DATE
October 2007
SOURCE
Multichannel News;10/8/2007, Vol. 28 Issue 40, p31
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Interview
ABSTRACT
An interview with Debora J. Wilson, president of The Weather Channel is presented. When asked whether the size and impact of Hurricane Katrina is a good thing for The Weather Channel, she mentioned that it a mixed thing. She believes that the combination of weather and sports online renders them a head start on the creation of content. She comments that they were able to start a program into a new content arena, climatology.
ACCESSION #
27775804

 

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