TITLE

VIEWFINDER

AUTHOR(S)
Harder, Chad
PUB. DATE
January 2013
SOURCE
Missoula Independent;1/24/2013, Vol. 24 Issue 4, p6
SOURCE TYPE
Newspaper
DOC. TYPE
Image
ABSTRACT
A photograph is presented showing ice crystals formation on the Rattlesnake Creek watershed at Greenough Park in Missoula, Montana.
ACCESSION #
88068661

 

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