TITLE

The first Lusitania note to Germany

AUTHOR(S)
Wilson, Woodrow
PUB. DATE
August 2017
SOURCE
First Lusitania Note to Germany;8/1/2017, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Primary Source Document
DOC. TYPE
Historical Material
ABSTRACT
Presents the text of the first Lusitania note written by the United States president to Germany on May 13, 1915. German sinking of the ship Lusitania on May 7, 1915; American response; Other comments.
ACCESSION #
21213050

 

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