TITLE

"LIVING HISTORY" AS THE "REAL THING": A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE MODERN MOUNTAIN MAN RENDEZVOUS, RENAISSANCE FAIRS, AND CIVIL WAR REENACTMENTS

AUTHOR(S)
MCCARTHY, PATRICK
PUB. DATE
April 2014
SOURCE
ETC: A Review of General Semantics;Apr2014, Vol. 71 Issue 2, p106
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Essay
ABSTRACT
An essay is presented on "living interpretation" or historical reenactments with a focus on civil war reenactments, the Renaissance fair, and the Santa Fe Trail Rendezvous. Topics include a definition of "living history" by Dr. Jay Anderson and David Peterson, the different kinds of people who participate in the mountain man Rendezvous, and the iconography present in each living interpretation of history. Also mentioned is the Seventh Annual Maryland Renaissance festival.
ACCESSION #
99149552

 

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