TITLE

Na�ve Textualism in Patent Law

AUTHOR(S)
Siegel, Jonathan R.
PUB. DATE
March 2011
SOURCE
Brooklyn Law Review;Spring2011, Vol. 76 Issue 3, p1019
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Essay
ABSTRACT
An essay on the U.S. Supreme Court's shift from a rich, contextual approach to a textual approach in interpreting patent laws is presented. It decribes how the shift is creating a trend known as naive textualism where interpreters simply look up the meaning of a statute's words in the dictionary, apply a few canons of statutory construction and ignore other considerations. It outlines the Court's shift to this approach and discusses why it cannot be applied in interpreting the Patent Act.
ACCESSION #
64498623

 

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