TITLE

Women and the Cultural Politics of Printing

AUTHOR(S)
Stevenson, Jane
PUB. DATE
October 2009
SOURCE
Seventeenth Century;Autumn2009, Vol. 24 Issue 2, p205
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Essay
ABSTRACT
There is a marked upturn in printed literature by women in the seventeenth century, but this does not translate into 'the rise of the professional woman writer'. Much of what women printed was ephemera, written out of political or religious conviction, and was not financially rewarding for the writer. If we consider women who wrote for money, there are very few of them: one group of working-class wage-earners, another group of playwrights who earned a little extra from publishing their work. An important further group of women published in order to have copies to give to friends or patrons; in some cases, they may have been looking for financial return, but from a patron rather than from the publisher. Details of a book's lay-out and appearance as a physical object may clarify whether the author wished her work to be perceived as profit-making or not. While the notion of a 'stigma of print' has been challenged, this essay argues for a 'stigma of profit-making'.
ACCESSION #
48485163

 

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