TITLE

COUNTING STATES

AUTHOR(S)
Hills Jr., Roderick M.
PUB. DATE
January 2009
SOURCE
Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy;Winter2009, Vol. 32 Issue 1, p17
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Essay
ABSTRACT
An essay on state counting, a U.S. Supreme Court's practice of relying on state laws for the purpose of limiting its judicial power is presented. It says the court usually bases federal constitutional doctrine on state law. Also mentioned are two common elements involve in state counting, one of which is the use of state law to inform the content of the doctrine. It explains why and how the practice might be significant.
ACCESSION #
37171223

 

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