TITLE

NATIONAL IDENTIFICATION CARDS: POWERFUL TOOLS FOR DEFINING AND IDENTIFYING WHO BELONGS IN THE UNITED STATES

AUTHOR(S)
Redman, Renee C.
PUB. DATE
August 2008
SOURCE
Albany Law Review;2008, Vol. 71 Issue 3, p907
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Essay
ABSTRACT
An essay is presented on national identification cards. The 9/11 terrorist attacks put into motion the consideration of having national identification cards. The essay indicates that the purpose of the cards could be to identify who belongs in the United States. It acknowledges, however, that it may not help in the identification of potential terrorists. Issues regarding the potential abuse of rights, intrusion of privacy and who would be the card holders are also raised.
ACCESSION #
36412117

 

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