TITLE

GM won its point--flexibilty--in UAW contract

AUTHOR(S)
Crain, Keith
PUB. DATE
November 1996
SOURCE
Automotive News;11/11/1996, Vol. 71 Issue 5686, p12
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
Opinion. Comments on the agreement between General Motors Corporation (GM) and the United Automobile Workers (UAW). Need of GM to accelerate and improve its product; Fairness of labor negotiations between the UAW and automobile makers in the United States.
ACCESSION #
9612040154

 

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