TITLE

Commentary: Framing Oregon's Medicaid proposal

AUTHOR(S)
Churchill, L.R.
PUB. DATE
June 1991
SOURCE
Health Matrix: Journal of Law-Medicine;Summer91, Vol. 1 Issue 2, p227
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
Opinion. Presents a commentary on the paper by Peter P. Budetti on the moral implications of health care rationing, submitted to the Cleveland Conference on Bioethics held on June 3-5, 1990. Controversy over the virtues of existing Medicaid policies and the vices of the Oregon Medicaid Program; Inadequacies of both systems.
ACCESSION #
9609042698

 

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