TITLE

Shaping intelligence doctrine

AUTHOR(S)
Leeder, Stephen B.
PUB. DATE
July 1995
SOURCE
Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin;Jul-Sep95, Vol. 21 Issue 3, p5
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
Opinion. Comments on how intelligence professionals help shape the doctrine and training that underpin intelligence and electronic warfare (IEW) operations. Includes; Battle damage assessment; Definition; Lack of materials; Estimates of enemy combat effectiveness; Need to revise manuals to provide better information to address the complexity of IEW operations.
ACCESSION #
9510260553

 

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