TITLE

Look homeward, Mr. Clinton

AUTHOR(S)
Zuckerman, Mortimer B.
PUB. DATE
January 1994
SOURCE
U.S. News & World Report;1/24/94, Vol. 116 Issue 3, p75
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
Editorial. Discusses an extraordinary divergence in American attitudes on foreign policy. Public rejection of military intervention abroad under almost any circumstances; Objective case to support a minimalist foreign policy; Argument against enlarging the North American Treaty Organization's (NATO) mutual defense obligations to include countries of Eastern Europe; How President Bill Clinton was elected to deal with a neglected domestic agenda, not foreign policy.
ACCESSION #
9401207603

 

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