TITLE

Making equality work for women

AUTHOR(S)
McRae, Susan
PUB. DATE
May 1991
SOURCE
New Scientist;5/25/91, Vol. 130 Issue 1770, p10
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
Calls for industries in Great Britain to find ways to overcome discrimination against women in the fields of engineering, science and technology. Slight increase in females in these fields since 1978; The Finniston Report and the shortage of qualified engineers in British industry; Need for adequate arrangements for women returning to work; Study of recruitment, promotion, training and retention practices designed to attract women to technical careers.
ACCESSION #
9106174617

 

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