TITLE

MR Imaging of Crohn’s disease: what is the attraction?: Koh DM, Miao Y, Chinn RJS, et al., MR Imaging Evaluation of the Activity of Crohn’s Disease. AJR 2001;177:1325—32

AUTHOR(S)
Ott, David J.
PUB. DATE
January 2003
SOURCE
American Journal of Gastroenterology;Jan2003, Vol. 98 Issue 1, p211
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of MR imaging in assessing the activity of Crohn’s disease. Activity assessment is important in this disorder to identify patients with active inflammation so that optimal and newer forms of therapy can be prescribed appropriately . In this investigation, 30 symptomatic patients with Crohn’s disease but of uncertain activity were prospectively examined using MR imaging; 29 patients were scored using a Crohn’s disease activity index . MR findings were correlated with the activity index and also with endoscopy, surgery, or both in all patients.A multiphasic MR examination was performed using a variety of T1 and T2 techniques along with gadolinium-enhanced sequences; patients also ingested 600 cc of water for bowel contrast and were given 1 mg of glucagon to lessen bowel wall activity. Images were assessed by two radiologists who were not aware of the patient’s symptoms, clinical scoring, or results of other imaging; a consensus agreement was reached in each patient regarding the absence or presence of active disease overall per patient and also in specifically identified segments of the gastrointestinal tract.Results showed that 23 patients had active disease and seven patients had inactive disease as determined by endoscopic and/or surgical findings. MR findings in 124 of a total of 168 bowel segments were correlated to the endoscopic or surgical results. MR imaging had an overall sensitivity of 91% and a specificity of 71% on a per patient basis; the Crohn’s disease activity index showed 92% sensitivity and 28% specificity, while the per bowel segment results were 59% and 93%, respectively. Bowel wall thickening of more than 4 mm, bowel wall enhancement, and increased mesenteric vascularity were useful in identifying active disease on MR imaging; also, a layered enhancement pattern after gadolinium imaging was highly specific for active inflammation. The authors conclude that MR imaging is useful in assessing the activity of Crohn’s disease and may be helpful when clinical scoring is equivocal.
ACCESSION #
8903836

 

Related Articles

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics