TITLE

How effective are anticholinergic medications for urinary incontinence?

AUTHOR(S)
Weatherall, Mark
PUB. DATE
December 2012
SOURCE
Australian & New Zealand Continence Journal;Summer2012, Vol. 18 Issue 4, p100
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
The author discusses effectiveness of anticholinergic medications for urinary incontinence. He states that although several studies conducted on anticholinergic medications did not provide strong evidence for long-term use, these agents are still more effective than no treatment at all. He opines that the evidence base for alternative strategies is not as robust as for anticholinergic medications, so the clinicians should find best practice solutions.
ACCESSION #
83756442

 

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