TITLE

It's Not Over

PUB. DATE
April 2001
SOURCE
New Republic;04/23/2001, Vol. 224 Issue 17, p9
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
Addresses issues related to the letter presented by the United States' Ambassador in China to the Chinese foreign minister expressing regret for the aircraft accident involving a Chinese fighter jet and a U.S. spy plane. Reasons why the letter was sent; Details of the letter, in which the Chinese wanted the U.S. to admit fault in the crash; Questions related to American policy towards China; Focus on anti-communism policy and the expansion of free markets for the immediate enrichment of American businessmen and consultants.
ACCESSION #
4332686

 

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