TITLE

Serendipity, Echo Chambers, and the Front Page

AUTHOR(S)
ZUCKERMAN, ETHAN
PUB. DATE
December 2008
SOURCE
Nieman Reports;Winter2008, Vol. 62 Issue 4, p16
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
The author offers opinions on online journalism. He notes that one aspect of online journalism is the vast increase in the number of options a reader has to follow a particular news story due to the many links to other versions of the story and to related information which can be accessed through a publication's Web site. This is seen as problematic for journalism. Not only can too many choices create anxiety for the Internet user, leading to fewer Web site users, but the technology removes one of the important branding elements of journalism, the news judgment of the editing process reflected in the choices made about what information to present.
ACCESSION #
36234869

 

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