TITLE

Professional exposure to carcinogenic substances: is occupational physicians' activity compatible with medical ethics and deontology?

AUTHOR(S)
CIin, Bénédicte; Letourneux, Marc; Launoy, Guy
PUB. DATE
September 2008
SOURCE
Occupational & Environmental Medicine;Sep2008, Vol. 65 Issue 9, p577
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
The authors reflect on the occupational health practice that aim to protect and promote workers' health. They mention the principle of the International Code of Ethics for Occupational Health Professionals, which concentrates on the occupational physician as a protector of personnel. They reveal the effect of the publication of a decree relating to carcinogenic, mutagenic and reprotoxic risks (CMR decree) in France.
ACCESSION #
34317321

 

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