TITLE

Should we pay donors to increase the supply of organs for transplantation? NO

AUTHOR(S)
Chapman, Jeremy
PUB. DATE
June 2008
SOURCE
BMJ: British Medical Journal (International Edition);6/14/2008, Vol. 336 Issue 7657, p1343
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
The author reflects on the question of whether organ donors should be paid in an effort to increase the supply of organs which is available for transplantation. He suggests that they shouldn't because transplantation would be threatened by the act of paying for organs. He argues that paying donors for organs will reduce the overall supply of organs because many people will not donate if the government is willing to pay someone else for organs.
ACCESSION #
32745362

 

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