TITLE

Iraq war has had economic impact on Southern Arizona

AUTHOR(S)
Emerine, Steve
PUB. DATE
March 2008
SOURCE
Inside Tucson Business;3/31/2008, Vol. 17 Issue 43, p27
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
The author reflects on the economic impact of the Iraq war on Southern Arizona. The author mentions that the Iraq war had more influence on the economy of Southern Arizona than Tucson's chamber of commerce, other than business groups, city councils, county supervisors or state legislators. He mentions how many Arizonians died during the battle and how the economy suffered due to this activity. He asserts that Americans will pick the new president who will have her or his stand on such issues.
ACCESSION #
31550112

 

Related Articles

  • Five Myths About the Oil Industry. West, J. Robinson // International Economy;Summer2003, Vol. 17 Issue 3, p45 

    Cites the myths about the oil industry in the U.S. Implications of the Iraq War for American oil companies; Threat posed by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries for the U.S. national security; Profitability of oil companies.

  • Why Wall Street is skittish despite bright economy. Kailnoski, Gail // Fairfield County Business Journal;5/31/2004, Vol. 43 Issue 22, p15 

    Focuses on the factors influencing the wariness of stock market analysts and investors on future of the U.S. economy in 2004. Uncertainty over the war in Iraq, increasing mortgage rates and the November presidential election; Concerns on the volatility of the equity markets; Comments from...

  • NUMBERS.  // Time;10/8/2007, Vol. 170 Issue 15, p24 

    The article presents statistics related to topics including the number of employees who participated in a workers' strike against the General Motors Corp., the number of dollars being spent on the Iraq War each minute, and the number of dollars representing the net worth of the richest Americans...

  • No Baghdad bounce yet. Benjamin, Matthew; Lim, Paul; McDonald, Marci // U.S. News & World Report;4/28/2003, Vol. 134 Issue 14, p40 

    Discusses reasons why the economy in the U.S. has not improved following the war in Iraq. Observation that confidence seems to have picked up since the fall of Baghdad; First-quarter earnings from companies like Microsoft; Barriers to firms looking for sales overseas; Worries that the war's...

  • Victory Is No Panacea. Samuelson, Robert J. // Newsweek (Pacific Edition);4/21/2003 (Pacific Edition), Vol. 141 Issue 16, p11 

    Presents the opinion of the author that the end of the war in Iraq will not trigger an economic revival because the connections between military and economic success are emotionally strong and intellectually weak. Economic forecast the International Monetary Fund issued for the economy in the...

  • Victory Is No Panacea. Samuelson, Robert J. // Newsweek;4/21/2003, Vol. 141 Issue 16, p51 

    Presents the opinion of the author that the end of the war in Iraq will not trigger an economic revival because the connections between military and economic success are emotionally strong and intellectually weak. Economic forecast the International Monetary Fund issued for the economy in the...

  • Victory Is No Panacea. Samuelson, Robert J. // Newsweek (Atlantic Edition);4/21/2003 (Atlantic Edition), Vol. 141 Issue 16, p11 

    Presents the opinion of the author that the end of the war in Iraq will not trigger an economic revival because the connections between military and economic success are emotionally strong and intellectually weak. Economic forecast the International Monetary Fund issued for the economy in the...

  • Catching The Next Big Wave. Sivy, Michael // Money;May2003, Vol. 32 Issue 5, p67 

    Right after the fighting in Iraq began, the Dow enjoyed its best week in more than 20 years, reflecting hopes that the war would be over fast. But stocks quickly turned volatile again. Investors are worried not only about the future of the Middle East but also about the U.S. economy, which is...

  • Looking Past The War. Dobbs, Lou // Money;May2003, Vol. 32 Issue 5, p77 

    Interviews Martin Feldstein, the former chairman of the U.S. Council of Economic Advisers under former U.S. President Ronald Reagan, about the political economy in the U.S. Whether the U.S. can afford both U.S. President George W. Bush's proposed economic plan and tax cuts; Impact on the budget...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics