TITLE

Mortality benefit from unrestricted access to clopidogrel: Too good to be true?

AUTHOR(S)
Suissa, Samy
PUB. DATE
February 2008
SOURCE
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;2/12/2008, Vol. 178 Issue 4, p425
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
The author reflects on the mortality benefit of unrestricted access to clopidogrel. He notes that the question whether restricting access to certain prescription drugs leads to harm by underuse is still unknown. He believes that observational database studies are beneficial in addressing this issue. A survey shows that immortal time bias artificially inflates mortality among nonusers of the drug. He adds that this benefit from unrestricted access to prescription drugs was due to bias.
ACCESSION #
28802120

 

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