TITLE

COMMENTARY: Waist-to-hip ratio showed a linear association with mortality in middle-aged men and women, but body mass index did not

AUTHOR(S)
Bronson, David L.
PUB. DATE
November 2007
SOURCE
ACP Journal Club;Nov/Dec2007, Vol. 147 Issue 3, p79
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
The author reflects on the study that shows a linear association of waist-to-hip ratio, not the body mass index, with mortality in middle-aged men and women. He talks about the predictive nature of WHR and non-predictive nature of BMI for all-cause mortality in women. In men, both BMI and WHR were predictive in the highest quintile. He gives examples to support that BMI is a crude measure of body fat that does not include muscle mass, fat distribution, or ethnic diversity.
ACCESSION #
28019896

 

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