TITLE

OH, SAY CAN YOU SEE?

AUTHOR(S)
Ellis, Leslie
PUB. DATE
July 2007
SOURCE
Multichannel News;7/9/2007, Vol. 28 Issue 27, p21
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
The article cites the author's perspectives on the move of Home Box Office Inc. (HBO) to compress its 26 high-definition television channels using MPEG-4 for transmission. The author stated that the move matters in two levels, such that more networks will shift exclusively to MPEG-4, and that cable providers are not geared to handle an MEG-4 stream. Moreover, she emphasized that the issue is more on the cost than technology.
ACCESSION #
25736185

 

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