TITLE

Lost City

PUB. DATE
August 2006
SOURCE
New Republic;8/14/2006 - 8/21/2006, Vol. 235 Issue 7/8, p7
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
The author focuses on the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, Louisiana. He thinks a sense of national purpose in rebuilding the lives of those affected is absent. Reconstruction has been aimless and without leadership. Congress and local government officials have proceeded slowly and their procrastination will exact a permanent cost.
ACCESSION #
21971560

 

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