TITLE

Death provides renewed life for some, but ethical hazards for transplant teams

AUTHOR(S)
Dossetor, John B.; Dossetor, J B
PUB. DATE
June 1999
SOURCE
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;6/01/99, Vol. 160 Issue 11, p1590
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
editorial
ABSTRACT
Editorial. Focuses on the issue of organ transplantation. Obligation of the health care system to provide organs for transplantation as the norm of treatment; Efforts to be taken to obtain more vital organs and tissues after death; Reference to the study by Campbell et al in this issue; Criterion of irreversible function of the whole brain and brain stem, called brain death; Criteria for cardiopulmonray arrest; Issue of ethics.
ACCESSION #
1906651

 

Related Articles

  • The ethics of donation and transplantation: are definitions of death being distorted for organ transplantation? Joffe, Ari R. // Philosophy, Ethics & Humanities in Medicine;2007, Vol. 2, p28 

    A recent commentary defends 1) the concept of 'brain arrest' to explain what brain death is, and 2) the concept that death occurs at 2-5 minutes after absent circulation. I suggest that both these claims are flawed. Brain arrest is said to threaten life, and lead to death by causing a secondary...

  • MULTIPLE FACETS OF ORGAN TRANSPLANTATION IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT, INDIA. PRAKASH, K. N.; MENEZES, CYNTHIA; RAMESH, ANNAPURNA; HARISH BABU, S. // International Journal of Research in Commerce, IT & Management;Sep2012, Vol. 2 Issue 9, p61 

    First successful kidney transplantation occurred in 1954 & Liver transplant occurred in 1967, at U.S.A. Organs for transplantation comes from either from live donor or brain dead person. The major donor organs and tissues harvested from brain dead are heart, lungs, liver, pancreas, kidneys,...

  • Is it ethical to prioritize patients for organ allocation according to their values about organ donation? Bramstedt, Katrina A. // Progress in Transplantation;Jun2006, Vol. 16 Issue 2, p170 

    Because the supply of deceased donor organs fails to meet demand, patients needing a transplant frequently have lengthy waits or die while waiting. In an effort to reduce waiting times, the concept of "preferred status" has emerged. In the United States, preferred status has taken the form of a...

  • AN ECONOMIC MODEL FOR DISTRIBUTING BODY ORGANS. Healey, Bernard J. // Journal of Economics & Economic Education Research;2008, Vol. 9 Issue 1, p71 

    The science of economics is being called upon to offer potential solutions to many of the current problems in our health care delivery system. An area where economic analysis may be very useful is in the shortage of body organs for transplantation. The demand for body organs is far greater than...

  • SUPPORTING ORGAN TRANSPLANTATION IN NON-RESIDENT ALIENS WITHIN LIMITS. Bramstedt, Katrina A. // Ethics & Medicine: An International Journal of Bioethics;Spring2006, Vol. 22 Issue 1, p39 

    It is common knowledge that tile supply of cadaveric organs does not meet demand. This shortage is often used as ethical argument against transplantation in Non-Resident Aliens; however, this fact in isolation does not present a comprehensive picture of organ allocation in USA. Even though...

  • Kidneys for transplant. Geddes, Colin C.; Rodger, R. Stuart C. // BMJ: British Medical Journal (International Edition);5/13/2006, Vol. 332 Issue 7550, p1105 

    The article reports on initiatives to increase the number of total kidneys available for transplant, and to change the way organs are allocated in Great Britain. Some hospitals are now able to retrieve organs form donors whose hearts have stopped beating, as well as from brain dead donors. The...

  • Kidney and liver transplants from donors after cardiac death: initial experience at the London Health Sciences Centre. Hernandez-Alejandro, Roberto; Caumartin, Yves; Marotta, Paul J.; Ghent, Cameron; Levstik, Mark A.; Quan, Douglas; Muirhead, Norman; House, Andrew A.; McAlister, Vivian; Jevnikar, Anthony M.; Luke, Patrick P. W.; Wall, William // Canadian Journal of Surgery;Apr2010, Vol. 53 Issue 2, p93 

    BACKGROUND: The disparity between the number of patients waiting for an organ transplant and availability of donor organs increases each year in Canada. Donation after cardiac death (DCD), following withdrawal of life support in patients with hopeless prognoses, is a means of addressing the...

  • Successful Transplantation of Organs from a Donor with Bacterial Meningitis Caused by Streptococcus pneumonia. Eunjung Park; Sang-Cheon Choi; Youngjoo Lee; Yoonseok Jung; Younggi Min // Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine;May2013, Vol. 28 Issue 2, p115 

    The number of organs transplanted worldwide is increasing annually. As a result, there is a shortage of available donor organs. This scarcity has led to the progressive broadening of donor organ criteria. The expanded criteria include infections such as bacterial meningitis. A 55-year old male...

  • Kidneys from cardiac death donors comparable quality and survival.  // British Journal of Hospital Medicine (17508460);Sep2010, Vol. 71 Issue 9, p488 

    The article reports on a clinical study which showed that donor kidneys from individuals who have died recently from cardiac arrest perform just as well in recipients as kidneys from traditional brain-dead donors.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics