TITLE

South Korea: privatisation struggle

AUTHOR(S)
Ford, Neil
PUB. DATE
June 2005
SOURCE
Power Economics;6/1/2005, Vol. 9 Issue 11, p5
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
The article states that in common with many other liberalizing economies in the region, South Korea's program of power sector reform is proceeding far more slowly than planned. Some independent power producers (IPPs) are up and running and the generating assets of state power company Korea Electric Power Corporation, have been transferred to six subsidiaries. However, the government has backed down on some key elements of the privatization program and the administration of South Korean President Roh Moo-hyun has struggled to marry the desire to create a competitive electricity market with the need to maintain political and economic stability.
ACCESSION #
17207612

 

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