TITLE

Sudden Unexplained Death Caused by Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor (RyR2) Mutations

AUTHOR(S)
Wehrens, Xander H.T.; Marks, Andrew R.
PUB. DATE
November 2004
SOURCE
Mayo Clinic Proceedings;Nov2004, Vol. 79 Issue 11, p1367
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the association of mutations in the cardiac ryanodine receptor gene with sudden unexplained death. Use of molecular genetic analysis; Involvement of catecholamines in the onset of lethal arrhythmias; Molecular pathogenesis of catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT); Therapeutic approaches for CPVT; Implications for genetic counseling.
ACCESSION #
15031286

 

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