TITLE

EDITOR'S NOTE

AUTHOR(S)
Barnard, Richard C.
PUB. DATE
October 2004
SOURCE
Sea Power;Oct2004, Vol. 47 Issue 10, p4
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
The article presents information related to pirates. Pirates are usually depicted in movies as daring, good-hearted scamps who win over the prettiest girls right before the show is over. But most celluloid pirates are fun people. Murder, kidnapping, hijacking and robbery on the open seas are top priorities today for military and police officials from Southeast Asia to Africa and the United States. On average, more than one ship each day is attacked, robbed, hijacked or sunk according to Navy Secretary Gordon R. England, who is appealing for international cooperation among navies on issues such as piracy.
ACCESSION #
14892529

 

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