TITLE

Steel Workers' Pay

AUTHOR(S)
T. R. B.
PUB. DATE
July 1942
SOURCE
New Republic;7/13/42, Vol. 107 Issue 2, p54
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
Focuses on demand of workers of steel mills in Pittsburgh for the wage increase. Refusal of management representatives to grant wage increase; Opposition of management representatives to the anti-inflationary program of U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt; Attitude of Phil Murray, chief spokesman for steel workers, towards Leon Henderson, director of the Office of Price Administration and President's agent in carrying out price regulation policy.
ACCESSION #
14854308

 

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