TITLE

Washington Notes

PUB. DATE
June 1941
SOURCE
New Republic;6/2/41, Vol. 104 Issue 22, p758
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
Presents a general scenario in the U.S. amidst likely active participation of the country against Germany led Nazis. Account of victories of organized labor against automobile company Ford Motor Co. and steel manufacturers Bethlehem Steel Corp.; Analysis of statements by political leaders Earl Browder, Norman Thomas and John L. Lewis on the advent of fascism in the U.S.; Endeavor of the U.S. administration to protect what the labor class earned during peace; Efforts on the U.S. Department in getting the excess-profits-tax legislation passed in the U.S. Congress.
ACCESSION #
14707238

 

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