TITLE

Labor Leadership Sitdown

AUTHOR(S)
T.R.B.
PUB. DATE
September 1941
SOURCE
New Republic;9/8/41, Vol. 105 Issue 10, p307
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
Reports on recent socio-political development in the United States. View that the Labor Day holiday in the United States provides a long weekend to laborers and an occasion for labor leaders to make speeches; Statement of labor leader Phil Murray on this year's achievements; His view that labor, for all its gains, may find itself painfully squeezed between rising living costs on one hand and heavy taxation on the other; View that organized labor has not been taken into the defense organization as a full partner with industry and government; Report that ever since Murray succeeded labor leader John L. Lewis, his friends have insisted that he would presently get out of the Lewis shadow, dissociate himself from the Communists and take a hand in the fight against world fascism; View that organized labor is befuddled by its own leadership; Report that the President's latest reorganization of the defense high command was characteristically Rooseveltian as no one was fired and no existing agency was abolished; View that gazetteer Leon Henderson will test his price-fixing powers by trying to enforce his order clamping a $20 base price ceiling on scrap iron; Report that Henderson is determined to make an example of scrap dealers to nail down what power he already has, recognizing that the House may refuse to pass a bill broadening his authority.
ACCESSION #
14706881

 

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