TITLE

Who Smears Labor and Why?

PUB. DATE
March 1942
SOURCE
New Republic;3/30/42, Vol. 106 Issue 13, p413
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the nationwide drive to smear labor in the war industries in the U.S. Recognition by the public that labor in the war industries is not limiting itself to forty hours a week; View that the labor unions could do much to offset the bad impression that has been deliberately created by their foes; Attempt to do away with the overtime payments which at present begin after forty hours; Impression spread by newspapers in Oklahoma city that the working man drops his tools and goes home after forty hours' work; Charge that the Postal Telegraph Co. sent out messengers denouncing organized labor; Efforts by groups associated with the National association of Manufacturers to smear labor.
ACCESSION #
14699178

 

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