TITLE

Atomic Somersault

PUB. DATE
January 1954
SOURCE
New Republic;1/4/54, Vol. 130 Issue 1, p5
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
Comments on the condemnation of the proposal of U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower concerning nuclear weapons by the Soviet government. Abandonment of the United Nations Majority Plan for the control of atomic weapons implied in the proposal; Diversion of the attention from atomic weapons to atomic power; Need for Senate ratification of a treaty transferring sovereignty over atomic energy to a world authority; Invitation of Eisenhower for a private diplomatic talk with the Soviet government on the issue of nuclear weapons; Expectation that the important outcome of the plan is the cooperation between American and Soviet scientists and engineers.
ACCESSION #
14670517

 

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