TITLE

Beria Loses: Can Freedom Gain?

PUB. DATE
July 1953
SOURCE
New Republic;7/20/53, Vol. 128 Issue 29, p7
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
This article discusses the impact of the death of Lavrenti Beria, leader of Soviet Union. The Soviet regime has a tremendous stake in Eastern Europe. its reliance on the uranium of the Erzgebirge alone may prohibit its retreat from the East Zone unless it is assured either of uranium supplies or of a new system for the control of atomic weapons. As the local communists lose support and local police forces prove unreliable, the Russians find it harder to withdraw and to leave the preservation of friendly power in local hands.
ACCESSION #
14451669

 

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