TITLE

Endogeneity in Marketing Decision Models

AUTHOR(S)
Shugan, Steven M.
PUB. DATE
January 2004
SOURCE
Marketing Science;Winter2004, Vol. 23 Issue 1, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
There are many critical concerns (including the accounting for endogeneity) when one is properly estimtating response functions. However, it is sometimes (certainly not always) better to leave some variables exogenous when building mathematical models intended to help decision makers. The exogenous variables allow the decision maker to better adapt the mathematical model to different situations and to incorporate myriad variables and constraints outside the model.
ACCESSION #
13038451

 

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