TITLE

Varying Views on the Solution of the War Manpower Problem

AUTHOR(S)
Robey, Ralph
PUB. DATE
December 1942
SOURCE
Congressional Digest;Dec42, Vol. 21 Issue 12, p319
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
The article throws light on the views of the author about the solution to the war manpower problem in the U.S. According to him, the solution to this problem needs to give special attention to three main points. Firstly, the average work-week hours of about 42.5 should be lifted to about 48 hours. Secondly, the present law requires the payment of overtime for everything over 40 hours a week. Thirdly are the so-called featherbed rules of various labor unions- the rules which forces the hiring of workers for which there is no need or artificially restrict the productivity of labor.
ACCESSION #
12325464

 

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