TITLE

Imports Surge, Trade Deficit Possible

PUB. DATE
January 2005
SOURCE
Asia Monitor: South East Asia Monitor Volume 1;Jan2005, Vol. 16 Issue 1, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Country Report
DOC. TYPE
Country Report
ABSTRACT
The article presents information on the import and export sector in Thailand. The strong trade growth that Thailand experienced in the first half of 2004 should continue for the rest of the year. In the first seven months, Thai exports rose by an average of 23.4%, compared with growth of 19% in the whole of 2003. Unless the oil price falls soon, Thailand's imports will remain at elevated levels, which in turn increases the risk that the country will record a trade deficit in 2004 or 2005. Export growth has been supported by a number of factors, including the depreciation of the baht against the U.S. dollar, and strong growth in Thailand's largest and third-largest export markets.
ACCESSION #
16794915

 

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