TITLE

Poverty Falls In Vietnam, But Challenges Remain

PUB. DATE
March 2005
SOURCE
Asia Monitor: South East Asia Monitor Volume 1;Mar2005, Vol. 16 Issue 3, p4
SOURCE TYPE
Country Report
DOC. TYPE
Country Report
ABSTRACT
This article focuses on poverty in Vietnam and the challenges herein. While poverty rates have been falling in Vietnam, the rate of decrease has slowed in recent years. BMI View: The government must do more to increase redistribution, while making more effort to reduce discrimination against Vietnam's ethnic minority groups, 75% of which live in poverty. Vietnam has made impressive progress reducing poverty over the past decade, with the proportion of the population living in poverty almost halving from over 60% in 1990 to 32% in 2002. The fall in poverty is due mostly to Vietnam's strong economic growth with real GDP expanding an average 7.3% since 1990.
ACCESSION #
16606052

 

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