TITLE

ETHICS AND THE DIGITAL DRAGNET: MAGNITUDE OF CONSEQUENCES, ACCOUNTABILITY, AND THE ETHICAL DECISION MAKING OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS PROFESSIONALS

AUTHOR(S)
PAULI, KEVIN P.; MAY, DOUGLAS R.
PUB. DATE
August 2002
SOURCE
Academy of Management Proceedings & Membership Directory;2002, pE1
SOURCE TYPE
Conference Proceeding
DOC. TYPE
Conference Paper
ABSTRACT
The purpose of this research was to better understand the ethical decision making of information system professionals faced with implementing an e-mail monitoring system. Specifically, three research questions were investigated: (1) Does the magnitude of consequences of a monitoring system influence the ethical decision making of information system professionals? (2) Does the accountability of information system professionals in monitoring situations influence their ethical decision making? (3) Does accountability moderate the relationship between magnitude of consequences and moral evaluations? Using a sample of 138 information system professionals and a fully-crossed experimental vignette design, the results indicated that magnitude of consequences influenced the professionals' moral recognition and moral intentions, yet only marginally influenced deontological moral evaluations. Accountability had little direct effect on information system professionals' ethical decision making; however, accountability did significantly moderate the relation between magnitude of consequences and both utilitarian and deontological moral evaluations. Implications for ethical decision making theory and information systems practice are discussed.
ACCESSION #
7519502

 

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