TITLE

Pudendal nerve entrapment in an Ironman athlete: a case report

AUTHOR(S)
Durante, Jaclyn A.; MacIntyre, Ian G.
PUB. DATE
December 2010
SOURCE
Journal of the Canadian Chiropractic Association;Dec2010, Vol. 54 Issue 4, p276
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Case Study
ABSTRACT
Objective: To present the diagnostic and clinical features of pudendal nerve entrapment and create awareness amongst clinicians of this rare and painful condition. Clinical Features: A 41-year old male ironman athlete complaining of insidious constant penis pain 12-24h after long distance cycling and pain after sexual intercourse. A diagnosis of "cyclist syndrome" also known as pudendal nerve entrapment was made. Intervention and outcome: Patient was treated twice a week for four weeks using the soft tissue protocol described by Active Release Technique® to the obturator internus muscle. After two weeks of treatment his pain decreased to a 5/10 on the pain intensity scale and he began to cycle again. After four weeks of treatment his pain had decreased to 1/10 in intensity and he continued to cycle. At follow-up, approximately 8 weeks and 12 weeks later the patient communicated that his pain is resolved and he has began to train for Ironman Lake Placid 2010. Conclusion: Pudendal nerve entrapment is a rare, painful condition and is often misdiagnosed due to the fact that the clinical manifestations can mimic other pathologies. It is important to be aware of the clinical features to obtain appropriate diagnosis and treatment of this condition promptly.
ACCESSION #
57331921

 

Related Articles

  • 4th Digit Pain. Ross, Chuck; Bregman, Peter; Mullen, Barry // Podiatry Management;Feb2014, Vol. 33 Issue 2, p34 

    A letter to the editor is presented regarding a painful fourth toe.

  • Entrapment of the saphenous nerve at the adductor canal affecting the infrapatellar branch - a report on two cases. Porr, Jason; Chrobak, Karen; Muir, Brad // Journal of the Canadian Chiropractic Association;Dec2013, Vol. 57 Issue 4, p341 

    Objective: To present 2 cases of entrapment of the saphenous nerve at the adductor canal affecting the infrapatellar branch, and to provide insight into the utilization of nerve tension testing for the diagnosis of nerve entrapments in a clinical setting. Rationale: Saphenous nerve entrapments...

  • Guyon Canal Syndrome: lack of management in a case of unresolved handlebar palsy. Brown, Courtney K.; Stainsby, Brynne; Sovak, Guy // Journal of the Canadian Chiropractic Association;Dec2014, Vol. 58 Issue 4, p413 

    Objective: To present the clinical diagnostic features including management of Guyon canal syndrome in a case with unresolved sensory deficits in a young female cyclist. Clinical Presentation: After 14 days of cycling across Canada, a 23-year old female experienced sensory loss, followed by...

  • Intraoperative Median Nerve Injury. Moore, Chad // International Student Journal of Nurse Anesthesia;Summer2011, Vol. 10 Issue 2, p11 

    General anesthesia relaxes the muscles of the body and eliminates protective reflexes that enable patients to respond to pain or ischemic injury. 1 The anesthetist must recognize body contours of not only the old and obese, but also the young, lean and healthy in order to adequately pad and...

  • Radial nerve entrapement in osseous tunnel without clinical symptoms.  // Indian Journal of Orthopaedics;Sep/Oct2011, Vol. 45 Issue 5, p473 

    Entrapment of a nerve in the callus of a healing fracture is not a common entity, but it does exist. The entrapment usually presents without neurological deficit. It is difficult to suspect the radial nerve injury if we need to operate on the same site. We present a case of entrapment of radial...

  • The Leg to Worry About: A Systematic Approach to the Differential Diagnosis of Vascular Disease, Radiculopathy and Entrapment Neuropathy, Part. Schimp, David J. // Journal of the American Chiropractic Association;Sep/Oct2012, Vol. 49 Issue 5, p13 

    Lower-back pain is a common reason for patients to consult a doctor of chiropractic. In isolation, lower-back pain is usually benign and self-limiting. But this is often not true among patients with concomitant lower-extremity symptoms. A strong determinant of disability associated with...

  • The Leg to Worry About: A Systematic Approach to the Differential Diagnosis of Vascular Disease, Radiculopathy and Entrapment Neuropathy, Part II. Schimp, David J. // Journal of the American Chiropractic Association;Nov/Dec2012, Vol. 49 Issue 6, p13 

    Lower-back pain is usually benign and self-limiting, but this may not be true among patients with concomitant lower-extremity symptoms. A strong determinant of disability associated with lower-back pain is the presence of a symptomatic leg.1 Part 1 of this article presented an evidence-based...

  • Nerve Compression Syndromes of the Upper Extremity: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Rehabilitation. MANSURIPUR, P. KAVEH; DEREN, MATTHEW E.; KAMAL, ROBIN // Rhode Island Medical Journal;May2013, Vol. 96 Issue 5, p37 

    Nerve compression syndromes of the upper extremity, including carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, posterior interosseous syndrome and radial tunnel syndrome, are common in the general population. Diagnosis is made based on patient complaint and history as well as specific exam and...

  • ASSESSING SCIATIC NERVE GLIDE: PART 2. LUCHAU, TIL // Massage & Bodywork;Sep/Oct2011, Vol. 26 Issue 5, p110 

    The article focuses on the common appendicular sciatic nerve entrapment sites. It says that appendicular sciatia can occur in different sites including under, over or through the piriformis, between quadratus femoris or gluteus maximus and intermuscular septum which can be assessed by Sciatic...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics